Category: Telemedicine News

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Patients with terminal cancer may be less competent to make big decisions

Patients with terminal cancer face difficult decisions. What treatment options support their goals? When is it reasonable to discontinue care? A study published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry shows that these patients may be less competent to make these decisions than their doctors think.

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Antibiotic-producing bacterium releases more metabolites than assumed

The bacterium Streptomyces chartreusis is an antibiotic-producing bacterium that releases more metabolites into the surrounding medium than scientists assumed based on the analysis of the genome. Many of the substances are likely released to mediate interactions with its environment.

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Researchers provide safety data for common antiparasitic drug used to treat Chagas disease

Benznidazole is one of the two existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas’ disease treatment. However, it is a poorly tolerated drug and its use to treat chronic disease raises safety concerns. Knowledge about its toxicity profile is scarce and mostly based on post-marketing observational studies.

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Computerized tissue-imaging may help predict early recurrence of lung cancer

Case Western Reserve and Cleveland Clinic are leading development of a computerized tissue-imaging program that could soon help identify which lung cancer patients are likely to face an earlier recurrence of the disease.

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Gout medication may help improve heart function in adult patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have shown that probenecid, a drug long used to treat gout, may be able to improve heart function in adult patients who experience heart failure.

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Tiny ‘brains on chips’ reveal mechanisms underlying brain’s wrinkling process

Being born with a “tabula rasa” – a clean slate – in the case of the brain is something of a curse. Our brains are already wrinkled like walnuts by the time we are born. Babies born without these wrinkles – smooth brain syndrome – suffer from severe developmental deficiencies and their life expectancy is markedly reduced.

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Stanford researchers explore how gut bacteria respond to common changes in habitat

Researchers at Stanford University are studying how bacteria living in the gut respond to common changes within their habitat, working with mice.

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Scientists¬†uncover genetic cause behind typhoid’s antibiotic resistance

The genetic cause behind a strain of typhoid’s resistance to five classes of antibiotics has been uncovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators at Public Health England and Aga Khan University, Pakistan.

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Clinical trial studying type 1 diabetes reaches full enrollment

A clinical trial studying type 1 diabetes has reached full enrollment. The Sanford Project: T-Rex Study, a Phase 2 clinical trial conducted collaboratively by Sanford Health and Caladrius Biosciences, Inc., has completed enrollment of 110 children with type 1 diabetes. The study started with two sites at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and Fargo, North Dakota, and expanded to 13 additional sites across the United States.

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Experimental treatment improves invisible symptoms of a man with spinal cord injury

An experimental treatment that sends electrical currents through the spinal cord has improved “invisible” yet debilitating side effects for a B.C. man with a spinal cord injury.

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