Month: October 2017

 

Study finds mitochondrial DNA damage in Veterans with Gulf War illness

Researchers say they have found the “first direct biological evidence” of damage in veterans with Gulf War illness to DNA within cellular structures that produce energy in the body.

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Small RNA molecules trigger cancer cells to commit suicide

Small RNA molecules originally developed as a tool to study gene function trigger a mechanism hidden in every cell that forces the cell to commit suicide, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer.

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New study describes how gene-environment interaction leads to congenital heart defects

Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

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Penn researchers functionally dissect gene variant linked to FTLD

Seven years ago, Penn Medicine researchers showed that mutations in the TMEM106B gene significantly increased a person’s risk of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the second most common cause of dementia in those under 65.

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Jealousy study in pair-bonded monkeys offers insight into human emotions and behavior

It’s perhaps one of the most common emotions to feel in a relationship, but one that’s virtually untouched when it comes to studying relationships in monogamous primate species.

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Dyslexia could be the result of eye spots that confuse the brain finds study

Latest research shows that dyslexia may be the cause of inability to spot clearly. A study with a small number of participants has revealed that most persons with dyslexia have dominant spots in both their eyes that cause them to see blurred images leading to their confusion with letters and reading, spelling and writing.

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Study aims to develop biomarkers of prematurity for predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes

Natasha Leporé, PhD, a principal investigator in the Department of Radiology and Imaging at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has been awarded $1.7 million from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH to study the impact of prematurity on brain development.

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Researchers examine how palliative care impacts heart failure patients

Patients living with heart failure receive palliative care significantly less often than patients with other illnesses, including cancer, despite evidence that such care improves symptom management and quality of life.

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New systematic review finds substantial regional differences in global calcium intake

Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

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Brazilian researchers find more significant cognitive deficits among early-onset cocaine users

People who begin using cocaine during adolescence display more significant cognitive deficits than people who begin using the drug in adulthood.

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