Month: September 2017

 

UNIST to develop self-powered tracking device for bird flu outbreak prediction

The official signboard-hanging ceremony of the Self-powered Mobile Tracker Research Center took place at UNIST on September 12, 2017.

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Researchers receive NIH grant to develop non-invasive technology for detecting atrial fibrillation

Researchers are developing a health app to incorporate into familiar technology such as a tablet or smartphone that will act as a clinical tool to assess atrial fibrillation, a growing heart ailment.

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Researchers explore new combination approach to treat high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas

University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers are investigating a new approach to treat high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas by combining two immunotherapy drugs with radiation therapy to stimulate the immune system to destroy the main tumor as well as leftover microscopic cancer cells that may seed other tumors.

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Poliovirus therapy triggers longer-lasting immune response against malignant tumors

An investigational therapy using modified poliovirus to attack cancer tumors appears to unleash the body’s own capacity to fight malignancies by activating an inflammation process that counter’s the ability of cancer cells to evade the immune system.

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People with high and low magnesium levels in blood may have increased risk of dementia

People with both high and low levels of magnesium in their blood may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the September 20, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Oxytocin promotes avoidance of unfamiliar situations after negative social interactions

Before you shop for the “cuddle” hormone oxytocin to relieve stress and enhance your social life, read this: a new study from the University of California, Davis, suggests that sometimes, blocking the action of oxytocin in the brain may be a better option.

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PET imaging helps scientists to study progression of Zika virus infection in mice

For the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study recently published online in the journal Molecular Imaging and Biology.

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HPV vaccine can improve chances of conception in some women, study finds

More than 40 percent of American teens are now getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). But, despite HPV infection being associated with reduced semen quality and lower pregnancy rates, there is still public concern about whether the HPV vaccine itself could affect future fertility.

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Pregnant smokers more likely to quit if they learn to manage negative emotions, study shows

A new study by scientists in the University at Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions has shown that pregnant smokers are more likely to quit if they can learn to manage negative emotions that lead to smoking.

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Workers exposed to dispersants during oil spill cleanup experience range of health symptoms

Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health.

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